Vintage iPod Tube Amp/Charger

Vintage iPod Tube Amp/Charger

This black stylish iPod amplifier/charger allows you to enjoy your playlists with the “warmth and richness only a vintage tube amplifier can provide”.

You’ll be amazed at how time-proven, pre-amp tube circuitry can reveal the subtle detail of brushes on a snare drum, or the sonic thunder of a Fender Precision Bass striking that low ‘E’ — as when the Funk Brothers’ James Jamerson sets the groove for Marvin Gaye’s “I Heard it Through the Grapevine”. Aural details that have been lost as MP3 files are compressed for storage and transmission, dramatically re-emerge through this 25 watts RMS per channel, all-tube pre-amp system.

Rugged steel chassis finished in gloss piano black includes massive power transformer, and 3 multi-plate vacuum tubes protected in a removable, ventilated cage. Optional stereo speakers in matching gloss black feature efficient ported Bass-Reflex design, 3/4” tweeters, and robust 4” woofers. Includes cradle inserts for all iPods (except Shuffle), 2 additional source inputs, S-video and RCA video outputs, 2 pair of gold-plated speaker terminals, and remote.

The Vintage iPod Tube Amp/Charger ($799) is available from Herrington.

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Robert Birming

About Robert Birming

Based in Stockholm, Sweden, Robert is a blogger and musician with an eye on innovative gadgets and design geekiness.

6 Responses to “Vintage iPod Tube Amp/Charger”

  1. All this for lossy mp3’s?

  2. “Aural details that have been lost as MP3 files are compressed for storage and transmission, dramatically re-emerge through this 25 watts RMS per channel, all-tube pre-amp system.” No they don’t. Any data lost to the compression process is gone into the bitbucket forever and ever and no amount of audiophile tomfoolery will ever bring them back. Yes, tube amps do sound different than solid state but that’s because they’re hooked to a musical instrument and not an mp3 player. It is awful pretty though.

  3. @jbrader, @Craig Stern

    Good thing iPods can play back non-lossy file formats as well.

  4. You can choose the quality of sound on itunes… when you put a cd onto the computer (and therefore the iPod) in the options you can go with default ok 128kbps and I think you can go down to outright junk sound, or all the way up to cd quality. Then again, it uses a lot more memory. I think it’s worth it, as I run a 60gig iPod; the little ones won’t be able to hold many songs in high quality sound.

  5. It looks amazing! and I bet it sounds great.

  6. One word for these polemic comments: FLAC

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